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IN CASE OF SUDDEN FREE FALL

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"Grown-up poems for grown-ups." Stuart Friebert

"I loved reading "In Case of Sudden Free Fall," Deborah Bogen's beautiful and remarkable oneiric prose poem collection. A delicious gem, it takes the reader on a soulful and transformative journey. Under Bogen's expert guidannce, we travel from enchantment to melancholy, to surprising encounteres with literary and artistic figures, to loss and death, and back to wonder." Helene Cardona

Chosen by Helene Cordona for the 2017 Jacar Press Poetry Book Award, "Free Fall" contains a suite of poems chosen by Jericho Brown for the 2016 New Letters Poetry Prize.

LET ME OPEN YOU A SWAN

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What we have in Deborah Bogen's Let Me Open You a Swan is sublime poetry, the rare gift of a terrifying look into the shaping of a warrior poet and her work. Michelle Mitchell-Foust

 

In Bogen, suffering cannot be transcended, and yet, while tribulation is fiercely present, it brings to the world an ironic and stubborn luster, a glint, a scintilla of light. "Let Me Open You a Swan" is a vibrant and wholly original work. Lynn Emanuel

Landscape With Silos

"Deb Bogen writes poetry that is naked and necessary, unadorned and political, intelligent and generous. The book brims with intelligence. And reality." --Carol Frost

"Bogen’s poems have a kind of unpretentious authority, sometimes ruefully realistic, sometimes quietly mysterious; the whole of Landscape with Silos goes to make something stronger and greater than its parts."--Jean Valentine

"Here are poems of a lively intelligence, agile, wounded, and wise... quite simply a marvelous book."--Betty Adcock

Living By the Children's Cemetery

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In choosing Living by the Children’s Cemetery as the 2002 ByLine Competition winner, esteemed poet and critic, Edward Hirsch, said "Living by the Children’s Cemetery provides a profound answer to the poet’s own call for "something sinister, something fragile, something Bessie Smith/ could sing."